Zigeunerweisen @ Blood Brothers!

Hey there, Emuls-a-weisen, I have a guest post up at Blood Brothers Reviews! They’re having a Seijin Suzuki month over there, so I contributed a review of the first film in Suzuki’s Taisho Trilogy: 1980’s Zigeunerweisen! Check it out here and enjoy!

And if you’re looking to watch Zigeunerweisen, it was recently released to Blu-ray/DVD in the Taisho Trilogy box set from the fine folks at Arrow Academy. You can find it at DiabolikDVD or Amazon.

Corpse Mania (1981)

Corpse Mania [屍妖] (1981)

Starring Wong Yung, Tanny Tien Ni, Yau Chui-Ling, Walter Tso Tat-Wah, Tai Kwan-Tak, Eric Chan Ga-Kei, Lau Siu-Kwan, Gam Biu, Jenny Leung Jan-Lei, Wong Ching-Ho, Fong Ping, Shum Lo, Lam Wai-Tiu

Directed by Kuei Chih-Hung

Expectations: Very high.


A title like Corpse Mania suggests a pretty high-octane horror film, but this particular Kuei Chih-Hung film has more in common with Hex than it does his maniacal black magic films (Bewitched and The Boxer’s Omen). It’d be wrong to call Corpse Mania tame, though. It exists in a sort of middle ground between the two styles, utilizing the look of Hex (swirling fog and moonlit studio streets) and the gross-out horror of the black magic films. Corpse Mania is full of horrific delights, but above all the defining element is that it’s more of a Hong Kong giallo than anything else, building mystery and intrigue as the body count piles up. There’s even a classic Argento “Killer POV” shot!

Corpse Mania begins when Li Zhengyuan (Eric Chan Ga-Kei) moves into an old house with his sickly wife. When they arrive, they only have a single bag of luggage and Li’s wife must be carried inside, raising the suspicions of the neighbors. Li also wears sunglasses and covers his face like the Invisible Man, which definitely doesn’t help the situation. A few days later, a horrible smell emanates from the Li’s home, and when the police investigate they find the body of Li’s wife, naked and covered in mealworms. Upon further detective work, they determine that sexual intercourse had been performed after her death. As disturbing as that is, it is only the beginning of the mystery surrounding Li Zhengyuan!

Continue reading Corpse Mania (1981) →

The Silver Emulsion Podcast: Ep. 16 – 1983 Horror Movie Ramblefest!

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Episode 16! Ramblin’ my way through the horror films of 1983, plus some talk on a few more movies, including Sammo Hung’s Eastern Condors!

Music Notes

Intro:

  • Ramsey Lewis Trio – The “In” Crowd
    • The In Crowd (iTunes, Amazon)
      • Featured in the Woody Allen film, Irrational Man

Incidentals:

  • Vincent Price Excerpt (From Thriller Voice-Over Session)

Outro:

  • Samuel Hui – 跟佢做個 Friend
    • Theme Song from Aces Go Places 2

If you’ve got feedback, throw it into the comments below, or you can email it to me via the contact page, and I’ll include it in a future show!

The podcast is embedded directly below this, or you can go directly to Podbean (or use their app) to listen. If you want to subscribe, paste http://silveremulsion.podbean.com/feed/ into whatever reader you’re using, such as iTunes.

Stephen reviews: Dominion: Tank Police (1988)

Dominion: Tank Police [ドミニオン, Dominion] (1988)

Starring Hiromi Tsuru, Masaaki Ohkura, Ichirō Nagai, Jouji Yanami, Michie Tonizawa, Yuko Mita, Yūsaku Yara, Daisuke Gouri

Directed by Kōichi Masahimo & Takaaki Ishiyama


“Cyberpunk comedy” is not a genre that you see very often, yet that’s what I’ve got for you today. The original manga of Dominion was penned by Masamune Shirow, best known for Ghost in the Shell. If you’ve never read any of his manga, it may come as a surprise to find that Shirow has a thriving sense of humor, but most of his works are suffused with an absurdity that doesn’t often carry into their adaptations. Nevertheless, Dominion is probably his most comedic story, and this four-episode miniseries revels in that silliness as much as it revels in its degraded technological future.

The series plays a bizarre homage to the comedy routines of yesteryear, dredging up stock sound effects that seem more appropriate to vintage Hanna-Barbera cartoons or Three Stooges episodes than anime. Dominion is relentlessly goofy, and handles pretty much all of its violence with a lack of gravitas that seems at odds with its dystopian setting. The Tank Police themselves are equally laid back and unconcerned with following the rules. An early scene has them interrogating a suspect by playing croquet with assault rifles and hand grenades while the poor criminal stands precariously with a noose around his neck and a grenade stuffed in his mouth. The squad’s chaplain tells him it’s better to rat out his friends and join them in jail than to abandon them and go to heaven alone. Things go downhill from there.

Continue reading Stephen reviews: Dominion: Tank Police (1988) →

The Silver Emulsion Podcast: Ep. 10 – 1982 Horror Movie Ramble-palooza!

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Episode 10! Now with more wheezing and labored breathing! Are you ready to ramble?!?!?!

Music Notes

Intro:

  • Takenobu Mitsuyoshi –The King of Speed
    • From the Arcade/Sega Saturn video game Daytona USA

Outro:

  • Mike + The Mechanics – I Get The Feeling
  • Takenobu Mitsuyoshi – G, A, M, E, O, V, E, R
    • From the Arcade/Sega Saturn video game Daytona USA

If you’ve got feedback, throw it into the comments below, or you can email it to me via the contact page, and I’ll include it in a future show!

The podcast is embedded directly below this, or you can go directly to Podbean (or use their app) to listen. If you want to subscribe, paste http://silveremulsion.podbean.com/feed/ into whatever reader you’re using, such as iTunes.

Curse of Evil (1982)

curseofevil_1Curse of Evil [邪咒] (1982)

Starring Tai Liang-Chun, Ngaai Fei, Lily Li Li-Li, Lau Nga-Lai, Yau Chui-Ling, Eric Chan Ga-Kei, Wang Lai, Leung Tin, Angelina Lo Yuen-Yen, Wong Ching-Ho, Lau Siu-Kwan, Jason Pai Piao

Directed by Kuei Chih-Hung

Expectations: The poster is great and I love Kuei Chih-Hung, so I have high hopes.

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There is a lot to like about Curse of Evil and its twisted family dynamic and ultra-gooey FX work. Unfortunately, the film is pretty hard to penetrate as the story is muddled and the characters are hard to keep track of. For instance there are a couple of pairs of siblings, but they both dress in the same clothes. I wasn’t really familiar with most of the actresses either, so as much as I feel dumb to say it, they all kinda ran together. But honestly, the writing of the individual characters isn’t strong enough to distinguish them from one another, so that’s really the main concern.

The story is one that requires an in-depth explanation of the past to make sense, and since this one’s only 78 minutes long, that means Curse of Evil opens with a big ol’ info dump. There was once a wealthy family, the House of Shi, but tragedy struck and bandits killed 13 members of the family. Their bodies were thrown into the mansion’s dry well and ever since then the remaining family members (only a mother and her infant son) have been cursed by the angered Dragon King. We pick up the film 20 years later, as Madam Shi is celebrating her 50th birthday. But, y’know there’s that Dragon King curse, so her son, now 20 years old, dies, along with his wife. This leaves their two daughters to be raised by Madam Shi. At this point the film jumps another 15 years, when the daughters are about 20-ish. Phew.

Continue reading Curse of Evil (1982) →

Haunted Tales (1980)

hauntedtales_2Haunted Tales [碟仙] (1980)

Starring Ching Li, Ling Yun, Lin Chen-Chi, Lau Luk-Wah, Yeung Chi-Hing, Ku Kuan-Chung, Chan Shen, Shum Lo, Liu Lai-Ling, Sa Sa, Lau Nga-Ying

Directed by Chor Yuen (The Ghost, Story #1) & Mou Tun-Fei (The Prize Winner, Story #2)

Expectations: The poster is great, so I have high hopes.

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Haunted Tales is a two-film horror anthology from the Shaw Studio, but those expecting a common theme between the tales should seek such synchronicity elsewhere. The first story is a reserved, classically styled ghost story, and the second is a debaucherous, exploitative morality play that’s closer to something Kuei Chih-Hung would have made. But while the tales do not complement one another, they are both engaging and quite entertaining in their differing ways, so Haunted Tales comes out as a great Shaw Brothers take on the horror anthology.

My research on the film led me to this post on the wonderful and always informative Cool Ass Cinema website. I encourage you to read the post if you’re interested in this film, or just some behind-the-scenes ideas of how the Shaw studio was run, and while you’re there explore the site a bit. It’s full of great stuff! Anyway, the gist is that the first story (The Ghost) began life with Chor Yuen as Hellish Soul in 1975, but production shut down and a few years later Ho Meng-Hua was brought in to complete some re-shoots (which also resulted in an unfinished feature). The Prize Winner, Mou Tun-Fei’s short that closes the film, also began shooting as a feature. Instead of completing the features, they were salvaged and combined into Haunted Tales. That explains the differences in tone!

Continue reading Haunted Tales (1980) →

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