About this Movie… Again

tumblr_mz7r3gTo9E1siksceo1_1280About Last Night (ALN) was an extra special treat for my Valentine’s weekend. Not only did I get to look at Kevin Hart and Michael Ealy for two hours, but I loved the soundtrack, AND I laughed my ass off! I wondered how this remake was going to go. I reviewed the 1986 ALN last year for our ’80s Valentine’s Love Fest. This version is so much raunchier, but so was the play Sexual Perversity in Chicago, which both films are adapted from. Well, I am very impressed.

I don’t want to do a compare/contrast review, so I will get it out now. I like that they kept the names and characteristics of best friends Bernie (Kevin Hart) & Danny (Michael Ealy), and best friends/roommates Joan (Regina Hall) & Debbie (Joy Bryant). I also liked the modernizing of the movie. I am an ’80s girl! I usually dislike remakes. But this remake kind of paid homage to the 1986 ALN. The new film kept Danny’s love of softball; they just changed the team to the L.A. Dodgers. I also like the details about Danny’s relationship with bar owner Casey (Christopher McDonald).

About the falling in love…
The movie opened up with a funky song, Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine by James Brown, which was appropriate for the opening dialogue between best friends, Bernie and Danny. They were waiting for the ladies, Debbie and Joan (Bernie’s previous night’s hook up) to show up for drinks. There is simultaneous dialogue happening on the way to the club by the ladies and inside the club (with the guys). I was laughing so hard as Bernie told Danny that he had “whiskey dick” last night. He had drunk so much that it was hard for him to get an erection. I love that the two couples had equal screen time. Bernie and Joan were the wild ones, while Debbie and Danny were calm and laid back, not really interested. They were too busy watching Bernie and Joan getting drunk and acting obnoxious. It wasn’t until Bernie and Joan went to the restroom (to bump and grind) that Debbie and Danny actually spoke each other. It was this conversation that led to a passionate night of making love, but an awkward morning after. The film shows the conflicts that arise when the individuals try to make a one-night stand into a love affair. Both couples struggle to communicate what being in love means to them.

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Something Just Right

SOMETHING OLD

somethingnew_6Something New (SN) challenges the old way of thinking that we should “stick with our own.” This is not a stereotypical interracial comedy like Guess Who, where there is no development of characters or the deep-rooted issues of dating “outside your race.” SN is an endearing love story that touches on the realistic struggles of dating interracially. I was skeptical on whether to include SN into our Black Love Fest, but SN details factual challenges from the perspective of a black woman. Kenya (Sanaa Lathan) is a senior accountant. She is obsessive-compulsive, neurotic, and complex. She works hard but plays little. Her main social life is with her besties: Judge – Cheryl (Wendy Raquel Robinson), Pediatrician – Suzette (Golden Brooks), and Banker – Nedra (Taraji P. Henson). They get together often and school each other on looking for an IBM (Ideal Black Man). They make a pact to, “Let it go, and let it flow.” Their mantra sets off a chain of new experiences such as Kenya going on a blind date.

SOMETHING NEW

somethingnew_7Something new can be a serendipitous experience. But it can also make us vulnerable and fearful of the unknown. Kenya accepts a blind date with a landscaper, Brian (Simon Baker). They meet at a Starbucks in L.A.. Kenya is so shocked and uncomfortable by Brian being white that she abruptly ends their date. Later, she unexpectedly sees Brian at a dinner party of their mutual friend. She discovers that Brian did the beautiful landscaping. I love when Brian tells her, “If you’re ever ready, call me.” This definitely has a double meaning. Kenya only agrees that he can be her landscaper after he sends her a copy of Charlotte’s Web. Charlotte is crossed out and replaced by “Kenya’s Web” after a “spider incident” at the nursery. It is during an unplanned and unwanted hike that they share a kiss. Kenya loses herself in the kiss until she realizes whom she is kissing. She is disturbed and asks to be taken home. When Brian drops her off she tries to get rid of him, but he starts to kiss her against the wall. His hands are all over her. He takes charge and they make passionate love, which is followed by an endearing pillow talk scene where he caresses and kisses her face. He unfortunately ruins it by asking her if can she take her hair off. That is a “hell no” with black women who wear weaves. He said he was just wondering what she looks like completely naked, but she was pissed, and kicked him out.

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The Game of Love

loveandbasketball_1FIRST QUARTER… early ’80s

The title Love and Basketball (LAB) is appropriate for this film; it’s about the deep love of two people and a deep love for basketball. The film chronicles the love story of two neighbors: Monica (Sanaa Lathan) and Quincy (Omar Epps). The movie opens up with 11-year-old Monica moving in next door to Quincy “Q” in Baldwin Hills, CA. Monica joins a pick-up game with Q and his two friends. First words out Quincy’s mouth, “Girls can’t play no ball,” and Monica’s response is, “I ball better than you.” This becomes the theme of what will continue to be a conflict with both characters: Monica’s attitude and need to defend the pressures associated with being a female baller, and Quincy’s privileged idealism of being a baller, and son of an NBA player.

The film establishes all the characters and family dynamics within the first 10 minutes. I will stop and reiterate that most romantic comedies/dramas are similar; people meet, fall in love, and live happily ever after. What makes movies unique (especially black films) are the nostalgic factors such as identifying with characters, the music, and exposure to black culture. There are many examples throughout the movie. What stands out the most to me is the music, and the scene where Monica’s sister, Kerry (Monica Calhoun), is combing Monica’s hair. That is something I often did for my siblings growing up; “greasing scalps,” and “oiling” hair has always been prevalent in black culture. The music is authentic in mirroring the trials and tribulations of the actors. The song Candy Girl by New Edition is blasting in the background as they start their pick-up game.

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I Want Some of Your Brown Sugar…oohooh

brown-sugar5When writing a review I rarely think of the basic plot; it’s usually very typical. I am usually looking for unique moments that get me emotionally invested. My favorite quote is, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel,” by Maya Angelou. This sums up Brown Sugar. There are many forgettable moments in the movie, but the way I felt about the music as a metaphor to falling in love… well, it was magical!

The movie opens with a split screen of a woman packing the evolution of hip hop, through images of mixed tapes (Biz Markie, Monie Love, Angie B.), pictures of Boogie Down Productions, pictures of break dancers with Kangol hats and boom boxes, and posters of Salt and Pepa and Gang Starr. The song Love of My Life by The Roots is playing in the background. The song sets the tone of the metaphors that will become the basis of the story. Throughout the movie the main characters use hip hop music as a metaphor to their experiences and relationship.

brown-sugar6It’s all very reminiscent of my childhood. My brother, Quinton, and my sister Tamisha “Mimi” loved hip hop. Quinton carried on my mama’s tradition of playing music in the house. Sometimes when I play hip hop in the car from “back in the day,” I can see the shock on my son’s face when I rap. The lyrics are embedded into my memory, just like my childhood experiences with my brothers and sisters.

The next image is of the main characters Sidney “Sid” (Sanaa Lathan), and Andre “Dre” (Taye Diggs) as 10-year-old children. Sidney is narrating about the interviews that she conducts as an editor-in-chief of a hip hop magazine. Her first question to her interviewee is, “So, when did you fall in love with hip hop?” The scene reminds me of When Harry Met Sally. In WHMS throughout the movie they ask couples how they met and fell in love. It’s the same faces in Brown Sugar when a slew of hip-hop artists are giving real accounts of when they first fell in love with hip hop. Their faces light up as they tell us the name or location of when and/or where they were when they heard the song that hooked them. Sidney says she remembers the first day she fell in love with hip hop. It was July 18, 1984. It’s the day she heard three MCs: Dana Dane, Slick Rick, and Doug E. Fresh. Of course, this is also the day she met Andre “Dre”.

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Jonesing For Some Of That

lovejones_1Love Jones is the first review for our Black Love Fest. An authentic qualifier for a “black film” is a movie that is from the perspective of someone living the black experience. Love Jones is that, but it’s also a film that would be universally appreciated because of its love story, friendship, and artisan quality. I love the fact that the movie displays a beautiful black love story without constantly reminding the audience that it is a “black film.”

It is with a smile on my face that I listen to the movie’s opening song, Hopeless. The melody makes me want to cuddle up, and French kiss. Cinematically, the song matches the opening scene of black and white images of real people (non actors). The initial images are of an industrial area with a dreary backdrop of Chicago’s Hyde Park. The images are of non-smiling faces and a neighborhood that depicts poverty. But then there are images of children, friendship, love, and genuine laughter.

The movie opens up with the female main character, Nina (Nia Long), standing by a window while it is raining outside. She is having the typical, “I’m done with men” conversation with her girlfriend, Josie, played by Lisa Carson.  The scene then cuts into an evening girls’ night out. Nina and Josie go to The Sanctuary, a poetry spot that features local poets and musicians. The viewer is immediately pulled into the scene of live jazz music while a group of friends are sitting at a table. There are four men: The Writer – Darius (Larenz Tate), Married Intellectual – Savon (Isaiah Washington), The Poet/Showcase Host – Eddie Coles (Leonard Roberts), The Playboy Jerk – Hollywood (Bill Bellamy), and one female, The Dancer – Sheila (Bernadette Speakes). They are at the table joking and laughing and swapping stories on being romanced. Throughout the movie the depth of the characters and their personal struggles are revealed.

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Mammas don’t let your boys grow up to be Urban Cowboys!

MOV_6923b109_bAs I roundup my reviews, I reflect on the components of a fan-fucking-tastic ’80s movie. If you don’t remember, refer to my About Last Night… review.

The movie Perfect got ten out of ten
Purple Rain got nine out of ten
About Last Night got eight out of ten
And drum roll please… Urban Cowboy got seven out of ten

Urban Cowboy (UC) was sweaty, slummy, and hot! Aaron Latham wrote Urban Cowboy. Latham also co-wrote the movie Perfect (1st movie we reviewed for Valentine’s Special), another Travolta film. Both films were based off of articles written by Latham in the ’70s. Urban Cowboy takes place in Texas. This Honky Tonk love story is centered around two dysfunctional lovebirds: “Bud,” played by John Travolta, and Sissy, played by Debra Winger. Bud is a hothead, country bumpkin who moves in with his uncle Bob, played by Barry Corbin, to find work at an oil rig. Winger lives in the same town and works with her parents. Sissy and Bud meet at the local Honky Tonk (#1), which is where most of the movie takes place. They start dancing after they antagonize each other and engage in some serious tongue action (#7). Of course, we get to see Travolta strut his stuff. This time it’s country (#10). I don’t know about you, but I’m ready to play the banjo and get my line dancing on! This movie was instrumental in revamping Travolta’s image. He wanted roles that showcased his acting and not his hip action. He definitely pulled off the macho thing. The country western dancing in this film was very sexy and masculine. It made me forget he wore tights in Staying Alive.

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About this Movie…

MPW-47461About Last Night is a rockin’ ’80s film. The movie is based off of David Mamet’s play Sexual Perversity in Chicago (which I know nothing about, so I will not discuss). ALN is a sweet love story. Boy meets girl, boy falls in love with girl, boy gets scared and starts making bad choices, boy breaks up with girl, boy wants girl back. Boy and girl try to work it out.

First let me get it off my chest… the ’80s were so TUBULAR. There are a few noteworthy things in this film. A fan-fucking-tastic ’80s movie has a few great components. No need to ask twice, here they are.

  1. Fricking social scene: cigarettes, bar scene, beer, sexism
  2. Fantabulous Music
  3. Bitchin’ Colors
  4. Bangin’ Clothes
  5. Bangin’ Sex scene
  6. Douche-ass friend, (peer pressure) and a BFF
  7. Scamming (with the tongue)
  8. Awesome male ass shots, not just female
  9. Airhead sidekick
  10. Tight-ass Dance scene

About Last Night (ALN) had eight of the “must haves” in an ’80s movie. The plot is about a couple falling in love. This is movie is hilarious. I love the way it opens with the back and forth banter between Belushi and Lowe. I also love the consistent use of “broad,” “Humpin’ and bumpin’”, and “…so, I’m fucking her.”

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